Week 14: Stupid Simon By Naglis

“Almost finished..,”I groaned with frustration.

“I only have to get the batteries.” I rushed out the door enthusiastically .

“Where’s Scientist Sam?” questioned the new intern Simon. “He must have left  this strange, eerie looking gun for me!”

Meanwhile,  I was strolling down the street peacefully, searching for the nearest store. I purchased my batteries and headed home.

“At least I have batteries handy,” sighed Simon.

ZAP. Uh oh. Walking back without a worry in the world my eye caught a glimpse of the Eureka Tower.

“ENLARGED BEES! SIMON!”

Week 12: Terrible Tom By Naglis

“What is that in your painting?” bellowed Tom.

“It’s a purple elephant,” I mumbled, embarrassed. “I painted it the way I wanted.”

Tom scurried to the teacher and snitched on me. That made him extremely happy. Tom’s a bully. He calls me a nerd because I play the violin. I had to get proof that he is bullying me. The following day I attached a microscopic microphone to my tie.

“Ha, you loser,” he sneered at me from across the room.

Who’s laughing now?! Because I’ve got evidence. Terrible Tom!

Kanturk Arts Festival 2019: One Chance By Naglis

One Chance

by Naglis Vaivada

15th of August 1846,

“What’s that hammered on the tree?” questioned Marie.

“It’s a notice, I think.”

It read, “17th August, 1846. The Titan, an enormous galleon, is leaving  from the north coast of Tory Island, heading for America.”

“That’s great!” exclaimed Marie enthusiastically.

I’m Ronan, I’m sixteen years old and I take care of my eleven year old sister Marie. Our parents died of starvation last December. We’d recently moved to An Baile Thoir. We live off scraps and forage for mushrooms and berries from the fields. So this opportunity to abscond from  the famine is exquisite. It would be tough but we have to give it our best shot.

It was leaving in two days so we hoped to travel 4.75 km a day. We trekked and trudged over steep mountains and boggy fields. It started to get gloomy so we decided to take a brief nap.

I opened my eyes. My glance dashed to the sun like a meteor.

“It’s midday!” I bellowed anxiously.

We put the fright behind us and carried on. The weather was numbing and bitter but we couldn’t accept defeat. We kept moving. Standing wearily at the cliff, my attention focused on the people queuing up to get on the immense vessel.

We scurried towards it swiftly. I could hear the waves crashing against the rocks and  the rain pelting against the rough sea.

I could feel my sweat and tears trickling down my cheeks. We stood wearily on the rugged, craggy boulder. I embraced my sister and watched the tall ship shrink from a ship, to a blob, to a speck and drift away into the never-ending distance.

Week 10: Pleasing Poppies By Naglis

I blinked and blinked and blinked. I was wide awake and I just could not sleep. I sauntered down the stairs and out the creaking door. I lived near the Flanders Fields in Belgium. My eyes skedaddled from left to right, scanning the beautiful, red poppies. I could picture the trenches and the injured soldiers in my head. I imagined the English and French battling the Germans. I entered the field and glanced at the poppies blowing peacefully in the wind. Four teenagers or young adults emerged from the shadows. They circled me and shouted, “What are you doing here..?!”

Week 9: Chubby Charlie By Naglis

“You have to start exercising more, Charlie. It won’t be baby fat forever!” my mother yelped.

My lazy self didn’t want to but my conscience knew I had to. The next day after school, I meandered home lazily. I changed my clothes and made my way to the woods. As soon as I started jogging my morale shifted instantly. After the first lap I was exhausted. My armpits were drenched. It felt like a soggy, disposed teabag had been stuffed down my shirt.

” Just one more,” I whispered to myself quietly.

I could feel the sweat trickling down my puffy cheeks.

“Aaaargh!” I plummeted to the bottom of a hole. I spotted two men with an orange and a yellow pumpkin over their  heads. The orange one spoke first. “You’d better have a great excuse for being here…”

Week 7: Phenomenal Portal By Naglis

I spotted the same man going to the same wall every, single night.

“What was going on?” I thought.

I was going to find out. My friend Emma and I skedaddled to the bushes and hid there. Waiting patiently in the bush, we slowly got drowsy….

“Aargh!” I bellowed.

I looked around, we still had time. It had been an hour of sleeping though it felt like a minute.

” There he is,” I rasped quietly.

Suddenly, I realised it was a portal! Emma shrieked with excitement.

“But where did it go?” she shouted.

We crept cautiously towards it, jumped at it… and you’ll never guess what I saw…

Week 6: Dastardly Day By Naglis

Slowly, I raised the bottle to my lips and took a sip sparingly. Wearily. I crawled dejectedly across the arid, desiccated wasteland. My heart was rapidly thumping inside me like a drum. The sweat trickling off my forehead was like a stream. My legs felt like they were about to flop onto the desolate ground. I was about to give up until I saw it. My eyes darted from one side to the other like a meteor. “The Treasure!” I sighed. Desperately, I reached down and it was heavier than I expected. I could see the shadow of a man with a cowboy hat. “You led me right to it!”…

Week 5: Gazing Gary By Naglis

Gary was a scientist. Not a normal scientist. He didn’t wear a fancy lab coat, instead he wore a goofy jumpsuit from the 80s. He was as arrogant as an overbearing politician. He was trying to prove that gravity wasn’t real. He lived in a bright pink cottage covered in graffiti. Every night at exactly 21:56 he would tilt his head upwards and stare into nothingness. As the years passed the people of St. Louis built a roundabout there. In a fit of rage, Gary let a roar out of him. Haughtily, he would stand there, tilting his head upwards and never moving.

Week 4: Pungent Pipe By Naglis

“Lights out!” roared the guard.

Earlier that day, I secretly snatched the keys off the guard. I cautiously sauntered across the cells, keeping my eye out for guards. I could see a dark grey pipe and it looked to be never-ending. It was my only hope. I dived headfirst into it and started crawling. The smell was pungent. I had no flashlight so I didn’t really know where I was going. I could just about make out a carcass of a dead rat. I was wet. I figured it was sewerage.

“Finally, the end,” I sighed with relief.

I got out and I could see an old dusty car. I could hear the sirens going off. I pressed my foot against the pedal and groaned when it just wouldn’t take off...

Week 3: Rotten Rottweiler By Naglis

“Ruff!”

I could hear a loud, alarming voice in the distance. I had to find out what it was. My parents had warned me to never go past the Potter’s house, but curiosity got the better of me. I quickly hopped onto my bicycle in a desperate effort to get there in time. In the distance, I could see a vast amount of houses but one stood out in particular. I could see the dried- out yellow grass in the garden, and on it a massive brown rottweiler. I could see its bulging, red eyes staring into mine. It darted towards me and greedily bit my leg. “AARGH!!”. 

Week 2: Deadly Door By Naglis

I always wondered, what was in that house. I was going to find out tonight. It was an ancient, black, wooden house with all the windows boarded up. I swiftly skedaddled across the road, making sure no one spotted me. I slowly twisted the handle and the door creaked open. I arrived at a long, eerie corridor. I turned on my flashlight. My heart was thumping inside me like a drum. The smell was of damp and decay. I could hear myself breathing heavily. I tiptoed cautiously. My flashlight started flickering. I could feel the sweat trickling down my spine. I reached a door half off its hinges. I shoved it open. Then everything stopped and the door slammed shut…

Week 1: Recruitment By Naglis

“We need to recruit more members,” I whispered.

“That lad over there doesn’t look bad,” replied Marcus.

Later on I sauntered over to him and asked a few questions. I was about to let him in until he said he was a trainee.

“I’m sorry but we are a doctor-only organisation.”

You could see the misery in his eyes. I could feel the weight of the guilt pressing against me.

“Actually alright, you can try out.”

There were realistic electronic dummies that needed saving and he saved them. We let him in and he saved hundreds of ‘real’ lives. So we built a statue outside the hospital to show what a good doctor he was.